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Monday, April 18, 2016

O IS FOR ... YOU REALLY MEAN THAT?

"All my life I have had to tell people truths that were difficult to swallow." 
 - Sigmund Freud

Freud's hair was beginning to darken as his temper was beginning to rise against Mark Twain.

I hurriedly asked, "So what letter in this Free Association are we up to anyway?"

"O", he answered curtly.

Before Mark had a chance to say something that would let me learn if one ghost could kill another, 

I said, "Opinion."

Freud scratched his chin.  "Odd.  You do not strike me as one who cares what another says of him."

"I don't except for what it tells me about them."

Mark nodded.

"When we are young we generally estimate an opinion by the size of the person that holds it, 

but later we find that it is an uncertain rule, for we realize that there are times when a hornet's opinion disturbs us more than an emperor's."

"Yeah," I laughed.  

"Anyone who sneers at the effectiveness of small opponents has never shared a bed with a mosquito."

Mark cackled,

"Ain't that the truth?  But truth is over-rated when it comes to opinions.  

I am not one of those who in expressing opinions confine themselves to facts."

 Freud drolled, "How unsurprising."

He saw the worry on my face. 

"This antagonism is of long duration within me I fear. 

My growing resentment towards the world was no doubt intensified by the necessity of having to be kind and tolerant every day."

Mark raised an eyebrow. "You call how you've been acting as kind?"

The storm clouds gathered within Freud's eyes, and I said at a clip.  "What is that next letter, Doctor?"

25 comments:

  1. It seems that Freud and Twain should never be together in the same room. But when they are it's so entertaining for us!

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    1. You're right: it's fun for us -- and for Twain. Not so much for poor Freud!

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  2. "Having to be kind and tolerant every day". (Even on very bad hair days, when nothing goes right, or as should). Boyo can I relate. Therein layeth the Blessing itself. Compassion given free daily, for those who are not judged to be deserving or otherwise. Love what your doing here with the A-Z challenge Maîtriser Roland. where else can I find an exchange b/t Jung, Freud, Twain, and McCord.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5gbDgptNlvA


    La vie est une bénédiction pour donner. Pour aleviate notre propre souffrance, nous nous réfugions à aider les autres à soulager leur, ainsi notre chemin vers le salut.

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    1. I believe that what we pretend to be long enough we become. I would think that would be the case with compassion -- but apparently poor Freud did not think that! I'm glad you;re enjoying these posts!

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    2. You don't suppose Freud might meet up with Gautama, Siddhartha, Shakyamuni ??? Now that could be a hoot. (all the same men, as known by regional history).

      "Wisdom and compassion are sometimes compared to two wings that work together to enable flying, or two eyes that work together to see deeply".

      The word usually translated as "compassion" is karuna, which is understood to mean active sympathy or a willingness to bear the pain of others.

      However You know this all too well, and I'm preaching to the choir, eh.

      Keep up this Great body of work.

      If no meeting with Siddhartha, how about Doestoyevsky. LOL. J/K, or am I? Heck I don't even know, its your story, your fantasy, and your doing a great job, and the last thing you need is my input. LOL. Kudos Mon Ami.

      Your right on all counts....~~

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  3. Hi Roland - wonderful how your mind wanders along the alphabet letters ... interesting to think about others' opinions as ideas they themselves have - I guess that's true ... and now I'll need to take further note ...

    Cheers Hilary

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    1. Thanks, Hilary. I thought Free Association would fit the bill perfectly for the A TO Z challenge!

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  4. I love the storm brewing in Freud's eyes. Super O post, Roland.

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    1. Freud held so much power over his patients. The more I learn of him, the more I worry about those patients!

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  5. Mark's not being kind either, but it's made for some great reading this month.

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    1. Ah, but Mark knows things you do not of Freud -- they will come out in the later posts. And Mark did, indeed, have his curt side -- but only with those he felt had hurt others. :)

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  6. I love the way you are developing the story between Freud, Twain and yourself - clever stuff!

    Susan A Eames from
    Travel, Fiction and Photos

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    1. I have fun imagining myself with my illustrious ghosts in Meilori's, the haunted jazz club.

      I am happy you are enjoying the banter, too! :-)

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  7. Opinions, great subject. What people think affect us all our lives, even when we try to ignore them. Some are louder than others, and still, for me at least, it's the ones from childhood. Those voices, opinions, are the hardest to quell!

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    1. Yes, opinions of significant others from our childhood becomes background voices in our present we hear when we make mistakes often. :-(

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  8. Storms are brewing, what happens next?! This is so much fun, Roland.

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    1. Twain does have an axe or two to grind with Freud -- but not the ones you might be thinking! I am happy that you are enjoying their banter. :-)

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  9. Honestly, I want to tell Freud off, but I'm a bit intimidated by the ghost of Sig. 😁

    Teresa

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    1. Don't worry, Teresa. The ghost of Mark Twain will do it for you! :-)

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  10. ...My growing resentment towards the world was no doubt intensified by the necessity of having to be kind and tolerant every day...

    LOL. Some days I feel exactly like that!

    Liz A. from
    Laws of Gravity

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    1. Each interpersonal transaction costs us emotional energy. During trying times, it is easy to call upon our emotional reserves and find ourselves NSF!

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  11. Maybe I'm just the mosquito, with nothing to say today, for I don't really like arguments and Freud seems so harsh. No doubt related to his childhood. Still, I find the dialogue entertaining in a whimsical, unexpected way.

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    1. Freud was a brusque man. He often talked to his dog during client sessions! I try to make the banter fun and whimsical -- while trying to be informative, too. I'm glad you find the dialogue entertaining.

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  12. Opinions - there are a lot of them around now, and everyone has one. Is Freud going to give you a personal analysis at the end of all this free association?

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    1. Our opinions tell the world more of us than of what we speak about. You'll have to wait until Z to find out. :-)

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